“There are many little ways to enlarge your child’s world. Love of books is the best of all.”

-Jacqueline Kennedy

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Archive for the ‘Readers’ Category

Major Darren Ivey of KCPD – Working with students who have experienced trauma

This Reader training resource is great for all Readers, all adults who work with children who have experienced trauma. Thanks for such fantastic community partners who help us provide and produce materials like this for our volunteers!

 


More Tips for Readers

We’ve been connecting with our teachers to get some feedback on strategies to best engage their students during our reading sessions.  Below are the tips shared by a first grade teacher at Garfield.   For the “animal name” strategies not all teachers use the animal names but most do teach the strategies. So for instance for “Skippy Frog”, the Reader could say, “Why don’t you try to skip that word. Read to the end of the sentence and then try the word again.”   These should give some ideas that will help with the kids.

Reading Strategies for Solving Words:

  • Eagle Eye- Look at the picture. Use the beginning letter of the word to make sense of it.
  • Lips the Fish- Get your mouth ready. Say the first sound.
  • Stretchy Snake- Slooooowly stretch each letter sound together.
  • Chunky Monkey- Break the word into chunks you know/look for parts you know.     c ar t     fl at    walk ing
  • Tryin’ Lion- Try to re-read the sentence. Think about what word would make sense.
  • Skippy Frog- Skip the tricky word. Read to the end of the sentence. Go back & try the word again.
  • Flippy Dolphin- Flip the vowel sound. If the short vowel sound doesn’t work try the long vowel sound.

Comprehension Strategies

Check For Understanding:

  • Start the book by making predictions. What do you think will happen in this story? Use the book cover or take a quick “picture walk” through the illustrations.
  • Ask questions and make comments during the reading process.
  • After reading a book, have your child tell you the events from the story in the correct order.
  • What was the problem in this story?
  • How did the character feel when…?
  • What was the main idea?
  • Encourage your child to make connections. Does this story remind you of another book you read, an event in your life, or a movie you have seen?
Categories: Blog, Readers, Reading

Tips for Readers

Recently a teacher suggested the following reading format/outline as help to the volunteers in her room.  Consider trying it with your student!

1. Talk about the pictures in the book
2. Scan for obscure vocabulary to preview (ex. ‘machine’ in a book about a farm)
3. Read together
4. Discuss the book– interesting things you learned from the book, if you liked the book, if you would read it again or recommend it to a friend?

*More Tips for Readers here

Categories: Blog, Readers, Volunteers


Local News: 2015 Volunteers in Lead to Read program take lunch hour to share a love of reading!

This year we’ve connected with Alliance for Economic Inclusion.  “FDIC’s national initiative to establish broad-based coalitions of financial institutions, community-based organizations and other partners in several markets across the country to bring all unbanked and underserved populations into the financial mainstream.” (read more here)  As this group has grown they’ve realized that education, chiefly reading, is a critical juncture for everything.  So we, along with many other organizations in the city, have come together to have dialogue and collaborate.  At a meeting in December we connected with Lindsey Foat, Reporter for KCPT & The Hale Center for Journalism.  This spring she approached us about featuring Lead to Read as a way of spreading the word about what we’re doing.  Of course, we loved the idea!  

We are excited to watch the story being told…and shared.  Take a moment and watch the video here and then even more importantly share it with someone.  We have a big vision, a big goal….5000 kids, that means we need 5000+ Readers…you can help us get there!

 


Did you know…

…you can log your hours served?  Many employers have incentives for hours volunteered, or perhaps you just want them for your records, no matter the reason it’s easy to create a record of your time investment.  Log into VolunteerMark (also located in the upper right of our site).  Once there your dashboard view should have a yellow box prompting: “Log My Hours.” 

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The next screen prompts you to select “Lead to Read” as your organization nd  enter your hours next to the classroom(s) you volunteered with.  If you volunteered all year in one classroom, you served 14 hours total.

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Once you’ve done that, Sarah approves each submission.  You will then be prompted with an email to print an official volunteer log of hours!

Thank you for serving with us this year, we hope to have you and two of your friends join us in the fall!  Watch for details of our Fall Kick Off/Training Event and 2015-2016 Reading Schedule.

Categories: Blog, Readers, Volunteers

Helzberg Helps + Wendell Phillips Elementary

In the spirit of Thanksgiving,  we want to give thanks to some of the incredible people that make up our organization.  This fall just after our training session at Wendell Phillips, I got an email from Reader Martha.  She said she was so excited about the program that she’d gone back to her office and told everyone about it (HOORAY!) in hopes of recruiting more Readers.  Martha works for Helzberg Diamonds.  Their charitable organization, Helzberg Helps, held a committee meeting that Martha attended and shared the Lead to Read mission.  They decided to donate some books to the school in September and as a Merry Christmas from Helzberg they would donate some Kindle e-Readers!  She worked with us to divide the book donations between the two classrooms we serve.  We then worked with the school principal, Ms. Brown to coordinate the e-Reader donations.  This week Martha & Joy (pictured below) presented the e-Readers to Ms. Brown to be donated to the library!  This allows any teacher in the building to check them out for their classroom.  They also provided giftcards so the librarian can download books that are a best fit for the students.  We are so excited to see Readers spread the word, become engaged with the schools and come to us with the ways they are thinking outside the box!     

HelzbergHelpsBlog

Martha Schofield, Joy Stover (Readers) and Ms. Deloris Brown (Wendell Phillips principal)

 


Why Lead to Read?

 

Why Lead to Read?

We started Lead to Read because we believe the single most important issue facing Kansas City is that an alarming number of children are growing up in this city without the ability to read. The graduation rates at our local inner city high schools reflect this reality. The percentage of students who drop out of high school between the 9th and 10th grade reflect this reality. The challenges facing the neighborhoods across the city as a result of crimes committed by teenagers reflect this reality.

 

The reality is, if you are in the 9th grade, but can’t read at the 9th grade level, but are stuck at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level, you can’t advance to get that valuable high school degree, the ticket to meaningful employment and/or vocational training or a college degree.

 

What will change the game for Kansas City? Increasing the number of students who actually make it through high school and have an opportunity to become contributors. That’s a fact. With a massive engagement in Lead to Read from the community… we can change the game. Please join us in reading at a local elementary school near you.

 

Gratefully:

 

Lynn and Jean Rundle

 

 

 


Reading Is Truly Fundamental by David Williams

With this being my 3rd year of participating in Lead to Read, I can’t help but smile thinking of the smiling young faces as we walk into the classrooms each week. But I also think about how the children’s reading abilities progress from the beginning of the school year to the end of the school year. I also think about some of the unfortunate stories, and the harsh realities of so many of the children’s home lives. Having grown up myself in the inner city of Kansas City Kansas, I thought I would easily be able to relate to their external environments. I found nothing was further from the truth. It seems that far too many children come from not broken, but shattered, homes. I listened to the story of the child that said he had to go to bed each night around 7:30 p.m., just so he had a spot on the bed. He said there would be up to 8 other children who had to sleep in that same room. He said if you were lucky you slept on the twin bed; if not, you slept on the floor. Another child said he virtually slept each night at a different home, depending on the day of the week.

Now don’t get me wrong, not all of their stories are so depressing, but again, far too many are. So as I sit here and look back on all those faces, the one thing that comes to mind is that all any of them want is to be noticed. They want us adults to show that we care. So for 30 minutes each week we, the volunteer Readers of “Lead to Read,” give them that personal attention. We show them we care, and by coming back week after week, we build trust. They feel special that their Reader is coming, just for them.

Having a 2nd grader myself and watching her reading skills develop, I take great satisfaction in knowing I can be a part of helping a child with not all the same advantages as mine, hopefully stand side by side with the same confidence as her, and to be able to go after the same job as her someday. Maybe someday these kids can speak to the generation after them about how they achieved success against all odds.

In order to achieve this, I revert to my title, “Reading is Truly Fundamental.” Too many of our children are told they are “the next great thing” when it involves sports. Parents will show up at a little league game, yet not show up at a parent-teacher conference. Maybe they are “the next great thing,” but if I can’t read a playbook, then what? How can I be a team player? If I can’t read a script or the words to a song, how can I get “the big part?” Now for the 99% who are just like you and I are, if I can’t read, how can I fill out the job application or create a resume?

So to those of you who have taken the time to invest an hour each week with Lead to Read, I say thank you. If you are already a part of Lead to Read, you know the smiling faces and the gratification I speak of. If you have taken the time to read this and you are not currently a part of Lead to Read, all I can say is there is a child out there who would love for you to show them you care!!!